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Industrial Real Estate Developments

Trammell Crow plans new industrial park in booming Apopka

The development plan submitted to the city calls for the construction of a speculative industrial park titled “Apopka Business Center” on nearly 80 acres of vacant land between Shelby Industrial Drive and Conrad Road. A rendering shows how one of the warehouses within the park will look.

Joining a host of other industrial projects currently underway in Apopka, Dallas-based Trammell Crow Company is planning to bring more than 700,000 square feet of warehouse space to the city — right next door to recently opened distribution centers for Amazon and Coca-Cola.

The development plan submitted to the city calls for the construction of a speculative industrial park titled “Apopka Business Center” on nearly 80 acres of vacant land between Shelby Industrial Drive and Conrad Road.

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Located less than two miles south of the Orlando-Apopka Airport, just west of S.R. 429, the property is bordered to the immediate east by the 180-acre, 2.1 million-square-foot Mid-Florida Logistics Center industrial park.

Developed by Missouri-based Blue Scope Properties Group, the Mid-Florida Logistics Center is currently home to warehouse space for a trio of national companies: Amazon, Coca-Cola and Goya Foods. Buildings within this park range from 255,000 to 656,500 square feet, and some space is still available for lease, according to its website.

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Directly beside the Amazon employee parking lot, Trammell Crow is looking to plop down three warehouse buildings of its own within its Apopka Business Center industrial park. The warehouses will vary in size, with the smallest measuring 120,192 square feet.

Site plans drafted by Langan Engineering and Environmental Services Inc. show the middle-sized warehouse spanning 146,775 square foot with the largest building covering 443,106 square feet. That amounts to a total of 710,073 square feet.

Plans also include 520 parking spaces across the industrial park.

Elise Maguire, communications and media manager with Trammell Crow Company, told GrowthSpotter the company is not yet ready to comment on this project.

Trammell Crow opened its first office in Florida in April 2021 when it moved into space on South Orange Avenue in Orlando.

The company marked that expansion into the Florida market with a news release in which it stated a goal of focusing on a variety of industrial developments throughout the Central Florida region, including both speculative and build-to-suit projects.

The future site of the Apopka Business Center industrial park is highlighted in blue. Next door, the site of the Amazon distribution center is highlighted in pink.

“We are thrilled to be re-establishing a presence in Central Florida,” Adam Saphier, President for TCC’s Eastern Operations, said in a news release. “We believe the state’s pro-business structure, the competitive cost of doing business, quality of life with affordable cost of living, the abundance of talented and diverse workers, and the dynamic economy will cause the robust population and job growth to continue for quite some time. Many of our national occupier and investor clients want to grow their footprint in this region and we are now well positioned to effectively serve these and new prospective clients.”

Trammell Crow, founded in 1948, is a global commercial real estate developer having developed or acquired 2,800 buildings valued at nearly $70 billion and more than 625 million square feet, its website says.

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As of March 31, 2022, TCC had $19.8 billion of projects in process and $10.1 billion in its pipeline. It employs 700 professionals in 26 offices throughout the United States and Europe.

Trammell Crow’s development portfolio includes a mixture of residential and commercial projects, including some that incorporate both elements. For example, the company is currently constructing a 20-story tower in downtown Raleigh, N.C., that will include 150,000 square feet of Class A office space, 242 luxury residential units and 16,000 square feet of ground-floor retail space, according to its website.

On the industrial side, the company’s website lists several business parks that have already opened or are currently in progress. A 76-acre industrial park Trammell Crow developed in Moreno Valley, California, names Amazon as one of its tenants.

Aside from the Apopka Business Center project, the company has no other projects in Florida, according to its online portfolio.

Meanwhile, this stretch of northwest Orange County — where several state roads diverge — has seen a surge in industrial activity in recent years.

According to a market report by national brokerage firm Colliers International, there was 4.2 million square foot of industrial space under construction across all of Central Florida in the first quarter of 2022. More than a third of that development, 1.9 million square feet worth, is happening in northwest Orange County.

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A lot of the industrial growth is springing up within five miles of the Orlando-Apopka Airport on land that was once used as fruit farms.

Missouri-based Summit Real Estate Group and Lakeland-based Blue Steel Development are planning two separate industrial parks in Apopka that would bring a combined 3.5 million square foot of warehouse space to the area.

Orlando-based Cadence Partners, intends to buy property north of its not-yet-complete NorthStar Logistics Center that would increase its warehouse stock to more nearly 1.3 million square feet.

Overall, the city of Apopka is experiencing a boon in residential and commercial development with 84 projects either in the planning phase or under construction, according to city records provided to GrowthSpotter.

All told, they would add 9,900 housing units and more than 14 million square feet of commercial space to the city’s inventory once complete.

Have a tip about Central Florida development? Contact me at (407)-800-1161 or dwyatt@GrowthSpotter.com, or tweet me at @DustinWyattGS. Follow GrowthSpotter on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.


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