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Brack family seeks residential zoning for 432-acre ranch on Osceola’s Jack Brack Road

The proposed Brack Ranch subdivision in the East Narcoossee Area straddles its namesake road and connects to adjacent neighborhoods.
The proposed Brack Ranch subdivision in the East Narcoossee Area straddles its namesake road and connects to adjacent neighborhoods. (Rj Whidden and Associates)

Descendants of Orlando’s first elected mayor, William Jackson Brack, are selling the Osceola County ranch property that has served as the family homestead for more than a century.

Brack, elected in 1875, settled at the Narcoossee-area cattle ranch after retiring from politics and lived there until his death in 1901. Now that community along the road that bears the family name is in the heart of one of Central Florida’s hottest housing markets.

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Members of the Brack family have applied to the county to rezone 432 acres from Agricultural to Low Density Residential and submitted a Preliminary Subdivision plan to allow for 721 new homes. Orlando developers Greg Clark of Loma Land Co. and Kyle Sanders of Sovereign Land Co. have the land under contract and are taking the site through permitting with the county.

The southern half of Brack Ranch abuts the new Wiregrass community to the east. It has three different lot sizes and housing product types, differentiated by color, and its own amenity center.
The southern half of Brack Ranch abuts the new Wiregrass community to the east. It has three different lot sizes and housing product types, differentiated by color, and its own amenity center. (Rj Whidden and Associates)

“We got involved with them last year and worked to put together a deal that everyone was happy with,” Clark said. “That part of Osceola County really is an A-plus location right now, and this ranch represents a doughnut hole.”

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The Brack Ranch property straddles both sides of Jack Branch Road and includes the segment with two 90-degree turns. The PSP replaces the hard turns with a traffic circle that reduces the turn radius allows for separate entrances to the northern and southern halves of the project.

“We’re replacing a hazardous traffic condition with something that is much safer and more beautiful,” Clark said. “It’s really the best way to address the situation.”

The developer has proposed replacing two 90-degree turns on Jack Brack Road with a large roundabout.
The developer has proposed replacing two 90-degree turns on Jack Brack Road with a large roundabout. (Rj Whidden and Associates)

The project also has road connections to neighboring communities: Taylor Morrison’s recently completed Hanover Reserve to the west and Wiregrass to the east, the 620-home community now in development by Avex Homes, Hanover Family Builders and Century/Dream Finders Homes.

The design by Rj Whidden & Associates preserves over 200 acres of wetlands and contains a network of equestrian trails that are required for new development in the East Narcoossee Area. Hanson, Walter & Associates acted as civil engineer and surveyor.

The subdivision plan calls for detached single family homes on three lot sizes at a total density of 3.64 dwelling units per acre. The 34 corner lots would be 70 feet wide, 120 feet deep and have a side garage entry. The plan includes 462 standard front-entry, 50-foot wide lots and 225 rear-entry 34-foot by 110-foot lots.

The Brack Ranch subdivision is proposed for 721 homes and could be split into two neighborhoods, each with its own pool and amenities.
The Brack Ranch subdivision is proposed for 721 homes and could be split into two neighborhoods, each with its own pool and amenities. (Rj Whidden and Associates)

The developers decided not to include townhomes. Park Square Homes has two separate townhouse projects in the pipeline along Jack Brack Road, both less than a half mile away.

“We felt like, based on our discussions with prospective builder partners, there’s more demand for a detached product on 34-foot lot,” Sanders said. “The product itself is 24 feet wide.”

The project is designed so it could be sold to one builder or split up and sold as two communities. “It allows for construction of separate amenities on each side of the project,” Sanders said. “We’ve received multiple offers, but we haven’t chosen a builder partner as of yet.”

Have a tip about Central Florida development? Contact me at lkinsler@GrowthSpotter.com or (407) 420-6261, or tweet me at @byLauraKinsler. Follow GrowthSpotter on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn.

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