xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement

Buyers begin shelling out millions for lots at Chuck Whittall’s Carmel community in Dr. Phillips

One lakefront lot and two interior lots sold within the 11-lot residential subdivision developed by Unicorp's Chuck Whittall, who is building a new home on Lot 11.
One lakefront lot and two interior lots sold within the 11-lot residential subdivision developed by Unicorp's Chuck Whittall, who is building a new home on Lot 11.(carmelorlando.com)

Developer Chuck Whittall has sold the first couple of home sites within his planned Carmel community in the heart of Orlando’s posh Dr. Phillips neighborhood.

About $4.85 million has been spent so far for three lots, according to property records.

Advertisement

Deeds recently filed in Orange County show the buyers include the former president and CEO of Hard Rock International, Hamish Dodds; and Orlando-based brand strategist businesswoman, Erica Berman.

Dodds, and his wife Suzanne, spent $2 million for a lot along Lake Tibet, while Berns spent a total of $2.85 million combining two lots within the 11-lot residential subdivision.

Whittall, who serves as president of Orlando-based Unicorp National Developments Inc., also intends to build a home for himself at the property. He told GrowthSpotter his home is “well under construction" on the largest lot of the property (Lot 11).

The developer is planning a new estate home community — and future place of residence — where home prices range between $3 million to $15 million.

When asked if the development has been affected by the economic impacts of the coronavirus pandemic, Whittall said he has not seen a slow down in sales.

“This is a unique project," he said. “We have several people looking at the other [lots] as well.”

Carmel is located west of the Masters Boulevard and Hubbard Place intersection. The privately gated community will feature one-acre estates and extensive tree and lush landscaping designs.

Lakefront lots are priced at a little over $2 million, while interior lots are going for just over $900,000 — meaning total sell out is estimated at about $24 million.

Whittall paid about $18 million for the lakefront land next to Arnold Palmer’s Bay Hill Club & Lodge last year.

The property juts into the waters of the Butler Chain of Lakes, where a number of exclusive affluent communities already enjoy the splendors of lakefront living.

Stockworth Realty Group’s Julie Bettosini is handling sales. Jones Clayton Construction Inc. is the builder.

Rial Jones, president and founder of Jones Clayton, told GrowthSpotter each home will be custom-built.

“The next two homes are in the final stages of design,”Jones said. “We hope in the next 60 days to be under construction.”

He declined to disclose any buyer information or how much it would cost to build each home.

“Typically the square footage number is between $500 to $750 per square foot,” Jones said. “Because they’re custom homes, prices are all over the board depending on how much they want to spend on pools, landscaping, design and those types of things.”

Advertisement

The story behind the burial mound site situated on land Chuck Whittall recently purchased tells the tale of what was uncovered in the 1920s and where those findings have been all of these years.

The property was previously owned by the family members of Francis Evans Hubbard, who founded Hubbard Construction. The family built roads throughout Disney property and much of Central Florida.

Prior to purchasing the lakefront land, it was made apparent to Whittal that the property contained a Native American burial mound.

The developer had to work with state officials, cataloging agencies, representatives of Native American tribes and a Secretary of the Interior qualified archaeologist to carefully excavate any possible left over remains and rebury previously excavated remains.

In a previous interview with GrowthSpotter, Whittall said they had found remnants in the form of archaeological materials such as pottery, beads and tools on the property with links to the Seminole Tribe of Florida.

About a quarter-acre of the property of the property was dedicated to the repatriation of remains and cultural items.

Have a tip about Central Florida development? Contact me at arabines@GrowthSpotter.com or (407) 420-5427, or tweet me at @amanda_rabines. Follow GrowthSpotter on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement